Get Ready to Rock the Mountain: Musilac 2018

Get Ready to Rock the Mountain: Musilac 2018

If you’re planning a ski holiday to Chamonix with a group of mates and can’t decide when to go, my advice would be to wait until April 2018. That way, you can participate in Musilac Mont-Blanc 2018, the ultimate party on the mountain! This new spring festival is expected to become one of the biggest annual music events in Chamonix.
What to Expect

 

Musilac is already famous in Aix-les-Bains, where it is a popular summer festival. Past headliners have included everyone from Elton John and Sting to The Chemical Brothers and David Guetta. For Chamonix, festival organisers promise an equally stellar line up: so far, 15 acts are scheduled to play from April 19 to 21.

The Festival will be a massive affair: it’s estimated that up to 30,000 spectators will attend the three-day event. An open-air stage will be set up at the Bois du Bouchet paragliding landing area, which will play host to audiences of around 15,000 each night.

To ensure that this is one of the major events in Chamonix’s 2018 calendar, Musilac organisers have partnered with MontBlanc Médias, a renowned French media group that specialises in extreme sports.

Ski the End of the Season or Just Hang Out

Whether you’re a keen skier and want to take advantage of Chamonix’s cheap ‘end of season’ deals or you just love the party atmosphere of a festival, April in Chamonix is perfect for you.

Set at the foot of Mont Blanc, the resort’s skiing opportunities are guaranteed throughout the spring, during which there’s a fantastic range of glacial skiing that really comes into its own from April onwards.

There are a range of nursery runs for beginners, – although the snow cover this late in the season can be risky – and for intermediate and advanced skiers, Chamonix’s challenging runs provide the ultimate high-thrill playground.

In town, you’ll discover that Chamonix is a bustling place with a cool, hip crowd that populates the resort all year round. There are some great bars and clubs, and the pretty centre is equipped with many nice café terraces.

If you’re looking for a group holiday during which you don’t want to hit the pistes every day, combining a ski holiday with one of the best events in Chamonix ensures that you’ll have a blast!

How to Get There

Taking part in the many events in Chamonix couldn’t be easier, as there are regular flights from the UK to Geneva, Chambery, Grenoble and Lyon airports during the ski season.

For a good-value transfer option, book a group transfer with Shuttle Direct before you leave home. Choose either a private or a more economical shared group transfer, and our drivers will pick you up from the airport and deliver you straight to your resort. It doesn’t get easier than that!

For Love Key: The History of the Waters

For Love Key: The History of the Waters

As a barge cruiser, the canal system is a complicated and balanced engineering feat. The keystone that supports this water channel is key. Whether run by key owners, followed up by barge owners, or controlled automatically by computer, the key allows fast and easy barge passage through the countryside. Without this engineering miracle, the canal trip is simply not possible. So, how is the key found and what exactly does it do?
When and Why Are They Invented? For Love Key: The History of the Waters

Rivers have long served as important trade and communication networks. However, this network is limited because the ship can not travel deep inland and it is very difficult to travel up through the river. The key, the invention that allowed the ship to gain or lose altitude, was developed by the Chinese in the tenth century and by the Dutch on the thirteenth. The initial “pound” key focuses on filling and drying small sized rooms, and facilitating the construction of the first independent waterway – or canal – that causes worldwide trade expansion. This arrangement also helps ships travel up or down in the domesticated rivers like the Thames.

This centuries-old invention is used today in some of the most important global trade routes – the Panama Canal, for example – and also allows for more relaxed travel, such as barge cruises. For Love Key: The History of the Waters

How do they work?

As we know, this technical miracle is designed to help boats upstream or downstream. If a ship wants to travel upstream, first the bottom gate should be opened so as to let the key drain. Next, the bottom door opened, and the boat could enter the room. After the gates of the lower and lower gates of the water gate are closed, the gate of the upper water door is opened, the water flows in and the water level rises. The boat is gently lifted to the next level and the top door can be opened safely, so the ship can continue its journey. Once again the same process occurs, but vice versa.

Getting Technical: Flights and Ladders

Engineers working with channels often have to cope with sudden changes. This can often not be handled with a single key, leading to a common feature of a channel called ‘flight’. This term refers to a group of 30 keys adjacent to each other, but with a sufficiently wide range between allowing the ship to pass each other. They gradually raise or lower the barge to the appropriate level. Since each room uses water from the above, the flight uses the same amount of water as a single key.

The more popular setting is the stairs; Here the top gate of one room acts as the lower gate above. To help with this process, the side pool is used to adjust the level perfectly in the upper and lower spaces. Of course, the best way to appreciate this amazing engineering feat is from the gentle barge cruise deck.

Paul Newman is a Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, France’s most respected luxury all-inclusive cruise liner provider and other major destinations. Part of an experienced barge team, Paul first queued to support a slow-paced barging cruise facility for anyone looking for a unique holiday experience. For Love Key: The History of the Waters

Trekking Tours And Other Things To Do In Vietnam

Trekking Tours And Other Things To Do In Vietnam

Who does not like to go on vacation? A few weeks in a far place where you can immerse yourself in rest, relaxation and other cultures.

One country that may not be the top of your list, but certainly, is Vietnam.

A country full of culture, history, and a place to relax to truly relax, there is something everybody should do there.

Let’s look at some great things to do in Vietnam.

Experience The Most Beautiful Culture in Relaxation While You are Visiting Vietnam
When you visit an exotic location, it is always useful to have an idea of ​​what you want to do. You do not need to schedule a trip to-time, but the general plan does not hurt.

What kind of things to do in Vietnam, you may ask?

Let’s see right now.

Trekking Tours Help you explore this magnificent country

What better way to explore the country than on foot? Get up close to the scenery, to the fresh air and enjoy the beauty of this hidden gem. Vietnam’s trekking tour is a popular way to see the country. However, some of the best are in the northern part of the land. Here you can leave the main tour behind and stay with the locals in their home, and experience the true Vietnam.

Visit War Time Museum Trekking Tours And Other Things To Do In Vietnam

The Vietnam war museum is a stunning and poignant place to visit. Describe the brutality of the conflict and the impact of civilians. If you love culture, then this is for you.

Pagoda Travel Offers A Relaxing Cultural Experience

There are several visit-based pagodas and day trips that you can take, offering amazing ways to explore the country, see the sights and experience the tranquility that is the culture of Vietnam.

Galore Day Trips Mean You are Never Short of Things to do in Vietnam

With so much to see and do, a day trip is a great way to make sure you see all the things you need to see in a country like Vietnam.

From the Mekong Delta tour to Halong Bay and even travel north to this country to places like Hoa Lu and Tam Coc. You will be hard pushed to run out of great things to do in Vietnam.

Hit the Caves if You Feel Adventurous

For those who want to get a little adventure while on vacation, there are some caves in Vietnam that offer what you are looking for.

From the vastness of Han Son Doong, the world’s largest cave to the Tu Lan cave, where a day trip will see you walk and swim past the caves before you reach the secluded beach where you can relax and enjoy the scenery.

Vietnam Offers a tourist paradise Trekking Tours And Other Things To Do In Vietnam
Whether you want to sit and relax in a hanging pond, take a walk in the forest and enjoy a relaxing cultural experience, Vietnam is one of the few holiday destinations that offer it all in a single package.

Covering tropical and temperate weather conditions, it has sunshine, rain and humidity, so having a game plan to do in Vietnam means you do not need to get caught unprepared.

What Type of Personal Event Can We Hold Here At The Manor Of Groves

What Type of Personal Event Can We Hold Here At The Manor Of Groves

 

The short answer to that question is: everything! A slightly longer answer is: like interesting events that may also be everything.

Take a look at our Special Events section on the Manor of Groves website, and you’ll begin to experience our vast expertise when discussing a wide variety of special events for all kinds of people.

From Baby Showers To The Celebration Of Life, What We Can Do (Almost) Everything What Type of Personal Event Can We Hold Here At The Manor Of Groves

If you’re looking for a special event venue you can trust – that really manages and organizes events for every part of the community, with its broad requirements – you just have to make Manor of Groves your choice of Private Event Places In Uk

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Besides, we hold a baby shower, for example, involving the mother-in-law to be baked with a glass of champagne, in front of an elegant traditional afternoon tea. But at the other end of the ‘cradle to gravour’ equation, we also host unique life festivals as special people remember.

Among them, we have enough experience in organizing graduation ceremonies and prom celebrations, which can be our own pride in one of us

suites are luxurious and well equipped. Indeed, if you want to hold such an event with us, we can offer you a range of packages to suit your budget and practical needs, from delicious finger buffet to dinner and elegant two-level disco.

Allow Us to Take Responsibility for Your Great Event

We can go on and on our long list of events, from third party parties to Christmas Eve parties – but it’s not just our past experience that determines whether you choose us as your private venue in the UK.

That’s because you also want all the practical requirements to be well noticed, such as ensuring that your preferred place is within easy reach (such as by road and train), and also competent in handling the most unexpected hiccups on the day itself.

These are all the boxes we are sure to mark at the Manor of Groves, so why should you put your confidence elsewhere when you want everything to go perfectly and the most beautiful memories to make? Just contact us now for more information about our famous, customized and affordable pricing packages. What Type of Personal Event Can We Hold Here At The Manor Of Groves

Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

This attracts a lot of people making money by posting videos on YouTube.

Tutorials, family vacations, product reviews and other silly antics make the rich overnight.

But have you ever heard of weedtubers?

These are the people who get paid to smoke marijuana and put it up on the internet.

That’s right – get paid for baking.

Read on to find out some of the most famous weedtubers around.

Joel Hradecky: King Weedtubers
Considered the king of the weedtubers, Joel Hradecky has over 1.2 million followers, whom he found only in a short time.

His CustomGrow420 YouTube channel featured videos including him who tried to suck THC oil grams. This video garnered over 1.3 million views.

That number is almost the same as 1.5 million who saw Hradecky cough for seven minutes after his effort. It seems that Hradecky’s success thrives, in part, on the psychological notion that humans enjoy watching other humans suffer. Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

But this marijuana king not only toke up and make the audience laugh (or mock) over the love of entertainment. Thousands of fans actually turned to Hradecky for recommendations about bongs, strands of marijuana and other accessories.

Josh Young
If you are primarily looking for advice and information about smoking weeds, different ways can be smoked, or weed prices, Young is your man.

On her YouTube channel StrainCentral, smoking young marijuana from 3-10 times a day, right next to the viewers.

Young thinks that sometimes his fans are just, “looking for friends smoking.”

In the same way as other weedtubers like Hradecky, Young also posted a video showing the effort to smoke a large quantity of THC in a short time and its horrible effects.

With over 373,000 subscribers, Young obviously makes a really good smoking buddy!

Reef Reef Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up
Being a harvester is not just for boys. Do not worry women, you can also be famous for smoking on YouTube too!

Just look at Coral Reefer. If you are looking for an interactive weedtube experience, Coral Reefer is your girl.

Coral Reefer hosts a live show every Sunday called “Stoney Sunday Live” where she answers pitch-related questions from viewers and fans. Coral is very passionate about marijuana and its many benefits.

Visit her channel and you’ll see her attend the cannabis show and share info about what’s going on in marijuana news.

Jane Dro
Another grass enthusiast who represents female cannabis lovers out there is Jane Dro. Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

If you want a more educational experience when it comes to marijuana, Dro is a great information center. Dro tells viewers about the growing ins and outs of marijuana and offers tips, as well as the look inside his own farming chamber.

Check out Dro channels for video and in-depth product reviews for serious and serious cannabis users. You might even see the following marijuana smoking star on our list while watching the Dro channel – both of which often appear in their respective videos.

Soundrone
You can not have a good smoking session without some nice snacks. Soundrone is about unboxing and reviewing products – and not just marijuana related items.

Visiting this unique channel channel will allow you to see candy, drink and snack reviews. A perfect compliment to your height.

His studies are often distracted by him who gets beaten from a bong or dull. Soundrone must have done something right because not only was he a successful successor, he was also a businessman.

Soundrone has its own hex axis line known as Bee Lasso.

Are you Next Next Big YouTube?
It’s hard not to be motivated by these itedtuber stars. They get paid to do what they love – that’s a great American dream, is not it?

Understanding the Weather of the Galapagos

Understanding the Weather of the Galapagos

The Galapagos Islands are blessed with a climate that means there’s never really a bad time to visit. Visitor numbers to each of the islands are strictly monitored by the national park conservancy, however, so most wildlife holidays in Galapagos tend to be in the same peak periods in order to minimise the impact on the habitat and animal species.
While the archipelago is on the Equator, the weather is not tropical. It has its own microclimate that could best be defined as sub-tropical in nature. There are two seasons – the dry season and the wet season – and, while it can be visited year round, the best wildlife holidays in Galapagos tend to be centred around the months between November and February.

 

Fast Facts on the Galapagos Climate

• The weather in the archipelago is governed by the ocean currents. It is at the convergence of three major currents: the Humboldt, the Panama and the Cromwell.

• Even though the archipelago is located in the tropics it has a unique microclimate, which is surprisingly dry.

• The El Niño weather phenomenon occurs every 5-7 years, causing sea levels to rise markedly.

• The El Niño effect can have a negative effect on the marine wildlife of the islands – particularly the sea lions and Marine Iguanas.

• In the warm season, temperatures average from 27ºC to 32ºC and water temperatures are between 21ºC to 26ºC.

• In the dry season, temperatures average from 21ºC to 27ºC and water temperatures are between 18ºC to 24ºC.

• The warmest months are January and February, while the coolest are from May to September.

• Due to its equatorial position, the archipelago has an equal number of daylight and darkness hours throughout the year.

The Warm Season: December to May

The most popular time for wildlife holidays in Galapagos are the months between November and May. Both the air and water temperatures are higher and it is peak breeding time for land birds and nesting turtles.

Although this time of the year is classified as the rainy season, there is also plenty of sunshine around. Periods of rain are usually short (although daily), interspersed with warm, sunny stretches. The islands are teeming with active wildlife and the warmer oceans provide calm seas and better visibility, making the perfect conditions for snorkelling and swimming.

The Dry Season: June to December

In the dry season, the Humboldt Current coming from the southernmost reaches of South America sets a chill in the ocean and the trade winds bring colder and often stormy weather. Mist settles around the high altitudes – this is the time the highlands are at their most verdant and lush. Due to the nutrient-rich waters brought by the southern currents, there are huge numbers of fish in the waters surrounding the archipelago. This results in a greater number of seabirds, including penguins and albatross. However, the chillier oceans are not quite as appealing for snorkelers or divers, and guided wildlife holidays in Galapagos are not as frequent.

How the Weather Affects Biodiversity

The islands’ three distinct ecosystems are all strongly affected by the weather patterns. In the years of El Niño, the terrestrial region is abundant with flower and fruit bearing plants, which also causes an increase in the populations of insects and birds. The marine ecosystem thrives with the arrival of the Humboldt Current, but the colder oceanic temperatures mean that the seaweed on which the Marine Iguanas and sea lions rely as a food source is greatly diminished. This causes problems not just in the immediate population, but also sees a decline in reproduction. In the years of La Niña (which produces the opposite conditions to El Niño), the reverse of all these effects is true in all three ecosystems.

An Island Guide to the Galapagos

 

An Island Guide to the Galapagos

The Galapagos Islands have long been a magnet to travellers interested in the ecology and geology of our natural world. This remote volcanic archipelago in the Pacific Ocean lies around 1,000km off the coast of Ecuador and supports some of the most diverse habitats on the planet. There are 13 main islands and numerous smaller ones, each with its own distinct characteristics. For anyone planning a trip to the Galapagos, holidays to explore this most unique part of the world can be enhanced by understanding some of the features and fast facts about them.
Bartholomew

 

While it is certainly not the largest, Bartholomew may be the most recognisable island. Its scenery is dominated by Pinnacle Rock, one of the most iconic landmarks of the archipelago. The tall, pointed rock just off the shore features in countless images of the region, providing a spectacular backdrop for the 360° views its high point. Bartholomew is also renowned as one of the best sites to encounter the magnificent marine wildlife, including Galapagos Penguins, sea lions, sharks and rays.

Espanola

Also known as Hood Island, Espanola is relatively flat, with the highest of its small hills measuring around 675ft. It is home to an abundance of wildlife including large numbers of sea lions and more than 12,000 pairs of Waved Albatross – almost the entire global population of the avian species. The breeding site at Gardner Bay, on its eastern shores, is also an exceptional place to explore the underwater life and encounter Marine Iguanas sunning themselves on the rocky beaches.

Isabela

The largest of all the islands, Isabela is in fact five small volcanoes joined together – all of which are still active. As such, the landscape is quite dramatic and varied, from the dense vegetation of the southern highlands to stark lava fields and mangrove swamps at lower altitudes. For visitors on Galapagos holidays, Isabela has multiple sites of interest including the vast wetlands, which support a huge variety of endemic and breeding birdlife.

Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz has six different vegetation zones, and the astounding diversity of its habitat is matched by the diversity and abundance of its wildlife species. Along with the opportunity to explore the many wild reptilian species of the highlands, it an integral part of the itinerary of most Galapagos holidays as it is the location of the Charles Darwin Research Station. The facility is an important breeding, education and research facility dedicated to the conservation of the Giant Tortoise, one of the most iconic species of the archipelago.

Fernandina

Fernandina is the youngest of all the islands, with its last volcanic activity recorded in 2009 from its centrepiece, La Cumbre. Renowned for its magnificent scenery, it is considered one of the world’s most untouched ecosystems, with no foreign species ever believed to have arrived on its shores. It is home to the nesting site of the unique flightless cormorants, along with the Blue Footed Booby and the elusive Galapagos Hawk.

A Unique Environment

The best Galapagos holidays are those with an itinerary that takes in both the large and smaller islands of the archipelago, in order to get a complete overview of not just its beauty but also its astonishing diversity. As one of the most fascinating places on Earth, scientists and biologists are still discovering new facts every year about this unique part of the world.

A Barger’s Guide to the Canal du Nivernais

A Barger’s Guide to the Canal du Nivernais

Amongst the beautiful inland waterways of France, the Canal du Nivernais offers a scenic cruising route through the bucolic, history-laden landscape of Burgundy. Originally created as a feeder waterway along which to float firewood, today it has a very different incarnation as a popular route for the new breed of barge holidays in France.
A Working Waterway

 

The 174km-long Canal du Nivernais serves as part of the wider Bourbonnais and Bourgogne link between Paris and Lyon. It runs north-south between the basin of the Seine (at Paris) and the Saône and Rhône, almost parallel to the Yonne. Along the way it connects the Yonne with the Loire at Auxerre and Decize, respectively. Its strategic position was no accident and, in 1783, the French government commissioned its construction as a channel to transport the firewood so desperately needed by the freezing residents of Paris.

It was many more years before it reached completion (in 1843), but it then became a vital transportation hub for everything from wood and wine, to coal, stone and charcoal. The canal is fed by the Yonne and also from the north by another feeder canal leading from the Pannecière Reservoir, via the beautifully-constructed and much-admired Montreuillon aqueduct.

There are 122 locks and 23 dams along its length and in one section three tunnels have been hewn from solid rock to allow its passage. Travelling through the tunnels has been described as a silence so complete it is akin to “the silence of a sepulchre”. Despite the magnificent feat of engineering required to complete its course, many of the locks were constructed to what were deemed ‘sub-standard’ specifications. This meant that with a length of only 30m, some of them were unable to accommodate larger barges, leading to a decline in the waterway’s usefulness.

It wasn’t until the 1960s that the local authorities saw the potential of the Canal du Nivernais as a touristic attraction, and an extensive decade-long rehabilitation programme was implemented. The works provided facilities and mooring for private and commercial vessels along the route, which has enabled operators to include the canal on the itinerary of their barge holidays in France. A host of surrounding attractions can be enjoyed from the water and on shore-based excursions.

Attractions en Route One of the most popular attractions en route is the magnificent Saint-Germain Abbey, in Auxerre. Dating back more than a thousand years, the monastic complex contains a veritable treasure trove of history within its cloistered walls. Along with the oldest wall paintings in the country, archaeologists have unearthed a sarcophagus from the sixth century and the crypts, nave and tower of the abbey are almost completely intact.

Something a little more energetic that can be undertaken along the canal route at the lovely village of Merry-sur-Yonne is climbing at the famous landmark, Le Saussois. This imposing crag set against a highly picturesque backdrop is renowned as one of the most challenging climbing sites in the country, although there are plenty of pre-bolted areas for novices to cut their teeth as well.

With a reputation as one of the most interesting and enjoyable places for barge holidays in France, the history, engineering and scenery of the Canal du Nivernais serve as an important reminder of the past and a delightful insight into the present.

Guide to Three Valleys: Our Favorite Ski Resort

Guide to Three Valleys: Our Favorite Ski Resort

Three Valleys is one of the best ski destinations in the world. Properly named, the region includes three valleys on the Tarentaise, which hosts eight individual resorts. With over 200 lifts and about 600km pistes to explore, Three Valleys is popular among visitors from around the world. Whether you are a novice skier or a sensation seeker, this resort has something for you. But with so many amazing resorts to choose from, how do you make a decision about where to spend your winter break?
Méribel

Méribel resort is divided into two parts. The beautiful and traditional village of Méribel is one of the more attractive French resorts, with many self-catering and catered ski huts to choose from. Higher above the valley, Méribel-Mottaret offers more ski-in skiing comforts to its inhabitants, but with aesthetic cost. Wherever you live, however, Méribel really offers something for everyone. The resort has a large selection of green, blue and red lines, with fantastic access to the rest of Three Valleys. Guide to Three Valleys: Our Favorite Ski Resort

La Tania

La Tania has a good reputation as a family resort that offers good value for money. The self-service and catered ski lodge at the base of the slope is perfect for those who do not want to carry heavy exercise equipment. Above the village, the trees provide a wonderful atmosphere for beginners to face easy green runs. Views of après in La Tania are limited, but Pub Le Ski Lodge regularly hosts live bands and offers happy hour daily.

St. Martin de Belleville

This small village exudes a relaxed and pleasant alpine atmosphere. Sitting in the sun loungers down the valley from Les Menuires, St. Martin de Belleville is a traditional mountain resort with bar, restaurant and self-service ski lodge and catered at the bottom of the central runway. Chairlifts provide quick and easy access to Les Menuires and over the ridge to Méribel, so this resort is perfect for middle skiers. If you like partying, you may want to go elsewhere, because après landscape does not exist in this lonely village.

Val Thorens

At 2300m altitude, Val Thorens provides snow-peak conditions throughout the year. Beginners can access free nursery slopes from the village center, with experienced skiers who benefit from a variety of different slopes. The only downside of the resort at this altitude is that there is little shelter in if the weather is badly set. Pistes Val Thorens sits atop a tree line, and a true ski purifier will not fail to appreciate the incredible path it has to offer.

Les Menuires

Unlike the rest of the Three Valleys, visitors to Les Menuires are predominantly French, so staying here will ensure a more authentic French experience. Architecturally it is not the most attractive resort, with concrete apartment blocks dominating the horizon in the village. But the 160 km pistes test will help medium and advanced skiers, who also benefit from easy access to Méribel with the Three Valleys lift lanes. Beginners are not forgotten – there are special nurseries that run to help them hone their skills in peace. Unless the snow is nice, however, they may struggle to find enough blues that are easy to continue.

Wherever You Choose …

Whichever resort you choose in Three Valleys, it is important to choose the type of accommodation that best suits you. Three Valleys has a fantastic selection of self-catering and catered ski lodges, so you can choose the best option to suit your budget and needs. Whatever you choose, a trip to Three Valleys skiing must be a vacation of a lifetime.

Belinda Smythson works for Ski Amis, a specialist ski travel agency and booking service that has helped avid skiers in their perfect winter break for more than a quarter of a century. If you are looking for the best catering accommodation in Three Valleys, Paradiski, Espace Killy or Chamonix Valley, Ski Amis is a go-to company for winter sports enthusiasts looking for a lifelong holiday. Guide to Three Valleys: Our Favorite Ski Resort

Cruising the Canal de Briare: a Barger’s Delight

Cruising the Canal de Briare: a Barger’s Delight

The picturesque Canal de Briare, which connects the valleys of the Seine and the Loire, is notable for a number of reasons apart from the delightful scenery through which it wends its way. A popular route for both private and commercial cruising vessels, the canal is renowned as one of the loveliest places for a barge holiday in France as well as being a highly impressive feat of engineering.
A Pioneering History

 

The canal is one of the country’s oldest manmade waterways, built between 1602 and 1642 under the patronage of Henry IV. When first constructed, it linked directly into the Loire at Montargis, but later in the nineteenth century the building of the famous Briare Aqueduct created a bypass to La Cognardière, 2.6km away. Despite its name, the aqueduct actually forms part of the Canal latéral à la Loire.

An Engineering Triumph

The canal was also the first to be constructed at summit level using “pound locks”, which feature a chamber with gates at either end to control the height of the water within. (Before then locks were created with a single gate.) A summit level canal first rises and then falls along its course, and in the case of the 57km Canal de Briare, it rises through 12 locks before falling through another 24 on an 85m descent.

During construction a number of artificial lakes were created in order to feed water into the locks. At the most precipitous location, Rogny, it was necessary to build what was in effect a “staircase” of seven locks in order to navigate the fall of the canal. While it was without a doubt an outstanding feat of engineering, the design caused huge hold-ups as each vessel had to navigate all seven locks before the next was able to pass through. In the end the staircase of locks was abandoned and the canal re-routed to bypass them, but the town was later renamed Rogny-les-Sept-Ecluses in their honour.

Attractions en Route

Along with the locks at Rogny-les-Sept-Ecluses, the many other attractions along the course of the canal make it a popular route for the itinerary of a barge holiday in France. In Montargis, one of the most renowned local businesses to have put this pretty town on the map is the Mazet Praline Shop. The confectioner still makes its praline treats to the recipe of founder, Leon Mazet, who opened the shop in 1903. As well as a range of chocolates and other delicacies, the shop is famous for its signature caramelised almond, the Prasline Mazet de Montargis.

Situated in the commune of Saint-Fargeau, the magnificent seventeenth-century Renaissance-style Château de Saint Fargeau is the cultural centrepiece of the region, with its chequered history dating back some one thousand years. Its present distinctive pentagonal construction surrounded by six imposing towers is built on top of an original fortress commissioned by Héribert, son of King Hugh Capet. Even though it is privately owned, many parts of the castle are open for public visitation.

From Ancient Trade to Modern Leisure

For many centuries the Canal de Briare existed as an important channel to transport coal, wood, wine and other supplies from the Loire Valley to Paris. Today, this beautiful waterway serves as one of the most appealing locations to explore on a barge holiday in France.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider for those looking for an all-inclusive, luxury barge holiday in France or other great destinations in Europe. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.